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Chiropractic Colleges and Universities

If you're one of the millions of people who suffer from back pain and have visited a chiropractor that has helped you, then you understand how important doctors of chiropractic medicine have become in this country.

In 2006, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were over 53,000 chiropractors in the U.S. who had attended one of the 18 chiropractic colleges and universities in the country that are accredited by the Council on Chiropractic Education.

What to Expect at Chiropractic Colleges and Universities

Those interested in attending one of the chiropractic colleges and universities in the U.S. must have at least 90 hours of college study before enrolling in a chiropractic program. The Bureau of Labor Statistics report that many students already possess a bachelor's degree before choosing one of the chiropractic colleges and universities in the country. Minimum requirements recommend courses in English, Humanities, several disciplines in biology, physics, chemistry and psychology.

Most chiropractic colleges and universities require a minimum of 4,200 hours of combined classroom and clinical work before graduating from the program. The first two years typically focuses on classroom study in anatomy, physiology, public health, microbiology, pathology, and biochemistry. The remainder of the training includes classroom training in manipulation and spinal adjustment as well as other specialized medical training and clinical training. At the end of the course in one of the chiropractic colleges and universities, students are awarded a Doctorate of Chiropractic. All states require licensure before practicing chiropractic medicine.

Those who successfully complete the program at one of the chiropractic colleges and universities can choose to take additional training to specialize in various modalities, including orthopedics, neurology, sports injuries, nutrition, rehabilitation, radiology, industrial consulting, family practice, pediatrics, and applied chiropractic sciences.

Since some chiropractors also use alternative therapies, some chiropractic colleges and universities offer students additional courses in water, light, massage, ultrasound, electric, acupuncture, and heat therapies.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, over 50 percent of chiropractors in the U.S. are self-employed. In addition to training at one of the chiropractic colleges and universities, chiropractors might need course in business, business management and entrepreneurship to successfully run their own chiropractic practice.

What Adjustment to Your Income Can you Expect Upon Graduating from One of the Chiropractic Colleges and Universities?

The demand for professionals who have graduated from one of the chiropractic colleges and universities and passed the board licensure exams for their state is expected to grow, as the need for alternative health care grows. In 2006, the median annual earnings of salaried chiropractors were $65,220. The middle 50 percent earned between $45,710 and $96,500 a year. Ready to get cracking? Investigate which of the chiropractic colleges and universities is right for you!

Disclaimer: This site is not connected with any government agency or the U.S. Department of Education's Federal Student Aid office. If you would like to find more information about government funding please visit: http://www.studentaid.ed.gov